AWCheney’s Forum On Immigration

The City of Lost Girls: Femicide In Latin America

One of the videos that I featured on my last post, The Merida Intitiative, was “The City of Lost Girls,” a shocking indictment of not only Mexican law enforcement, but a deadly culture of corruption which is re-created in many forms throughout Mexico, and runs up through the highest levels of government…and tends to prey upon the Mexican citizens, particularly the poor, with impunity. No one, however, is totally immune. Because few people have viewed that particular post, I decided to repeat it here and give the subject greater coverage:

This film was shot in November of 2003 in and around the city of Juarez, Mexico in the Mexican State of Chihuahau, formerly known as El Paso del Norte. The estimated numbers of dead girls/women, most between the ages of 16 to 23 (although an average age of 16 has been cited) has ranged from 380 to 550 since 1993…and there are still an estimated 4000 girls and young women missing in this area (Amnesty International’s estimates are far lower than those of the local citizens). A great deal of attention has focused on the problem in Juarez, given its proximity to El Paso, Texas, as well as the large number of “NAFTA” factories which have located there. As a matter of fact, the draw of these factories for young women seeking work is often attributed as a major reason that this area provides such a fertile hunting ground for the predators who are perpetrating these crimes.

http://www.amnestyusa.org/women/pdf/Juarez_Guatemala_Action_kit.pdf

Excerpt from Amnesty International report from 2006:

“Since 1993, almost 400 women and girls have been murdered and more than 70 remain missing in Ciudad Juárez and Chihuahua, Mexico. All the evidence seems to indicate that these young women are chosen by their killers because they are women who have no power within Chihuahuan society, itself characterized by high crime rates and public insecurity due to the fact that drug trafficking and organized crime operate in the area. The women are often workers from the maquilas, or export factories, set up by the multinational companies that control the economy of Ciudad Juárez as well as waitresses, workers in the informal economy, or students. Many of them live in poverty, often with children to support. They are women who have few options but to travel alone on the long bus journeys that take them from the poor suburbs surrounding Ciudad Juárez to their place of work or study.”

The greatest difficulty in attempting to determine the TRUE numbers of dead and missing girls is a direct result of the corruption of the state authorities in Juarez and Chihuahua, who are believed by most to actually be complicit in not only the cover-up, but the crimes themselves.

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August 23, 2008 10:14 pm Posted by | Latin America | , , , , , , , , | 29 Comments

Open Discussion

I’ve put out a great deal of information over the past three weeks…and I’m having some computer difficulties again with my technical expert currently unavailable. It occurred to me that this might be a good time for readers to catch up on all this information (most of which ties together), and perhaps use it to do some of their own research, then come back here and do some brainstorming. Call it an open thread, open discussion, or whatever…it could prove interesting.

[UPDATE: I had intended to get a new post out today (actually, I should say “yesterday”), however, circumstances made that impossible. I hope to have one out, properly researched, by end of day (the 21st). This open discussion is definitely not getting a lot of interest, probably because everyone is looking for new information which takes a LOT of time to put together, so I also needed a break. By the way, if anyone has any suggestions for future posts I’m quite open to them.]

July 18, 2008 7:11 pm Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Identity Theft

Identity theft in American society has reached epidemic proportions. No one believes for one moment that it is ONLY illegal aliens who participate in this devastating crime, but the fact is that thousands upon thousands of them do exactly that. In fact, unless an illegal alien can find work for cash under the table on a regular basis, those actually employed regularly must have illegal documentation…because they don’t qualify for legal:

Although one’s first reaction might be one of sympathy, consider that this is in no way a victimless crime…the key word here being crime. Those people coming into this country illegally do so with intent to defraud our system with malice aforethought, so they are no less guilty than the American citizen who decides to go out and sell drugs, or mug someone, or break into a home to feed his family, perhaps even out of desperation…they have chosen to commit a crime and must be held accountable. Where is the sympathy for the victim in all this, and why should there be a double standard?

The following links are to videos of a cross section of such victims, and very enlightening:

Here we see that our soldiers overseas, and their families, can be particularly vulnerable to this potentially devastating crime.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UHxkTrZR_T4

What of those who steal a stranger’s identity and then proceed to commit another crime? One of the compelling reasons to identify illegal aliens who commit a crime (i.e. 287g program) is because, if released on bond, they are more often than not lost in the wind, assuming another identity. But what happens to those whose identity they have assumed?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhUVSJIeDLg

We are asked to sympathize with the illegal aliens who come here, yet so many of them seem to have absolutely no desire to become upstanding members of our community. Having stolen an identity, it’s so easy for them to ignore any responsibility for their actions…at what cost to others?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fznCth75EsA

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July 9, 2008 4:45 am Posted by | Illegal Immigration | , , , | 8 Comments